Author: dxminiq

Lit Talk pt. 1

(ONE) Poetry isn’t dead. It’s just going through changes. (TWO) The existence of writers like Lang Leav and Rupi Kaur reflect a far greater issue than their writing. It all stems from a lack of educational interest. The reason being the teachers’ approach and disinterest in current literary trends vying to teach Emily Dickinson and Emily Dickinson. If the students are lucky enough Sylvia Plath might pop up. Oddly, these lit trends are often present and thriving in the realm of tertiary education — while also being isolated / reserved / exclusive to the literature, philosophy, and creative writing majors. I think the industry is pretty cannibalistic or incestuous. Good writers win the good awards and make the great books. But the literature never lands on the hands of common man because works like these were meant for people in academia. (THREE) Poetry is elitist. Literature is elitist. The community will always maintain its standards. One could say that no matter how famous Kaur and Leav are, they’re never destined to get featured in Poetry …

When Lists Turn Me On

To read a grocery list in front of a crowd, without ostentation, dispels the gap between the viewer and the viewed. This trope of defiling performative poetry, by means of delimiting the audience’s capability of judgement and taste, had often been the cliched situation into the notion of what separates a good artist from a lazy one. But before I, along with you, roll my eyes at this statement, let me extract one key idea I want to discuss from this picture —the list. Cataloging had always been the source of intent in poetry. Works like Hesiod’s Theogony, the Bible, and other epics listing names, dates, or any kind of taxonomy are good examples for this style. On the other hand beyond the intent of list poetry comes the purpose of taxonomy — to collect and record things that are in the same category as the other. And I’ve come to realize that, I guess, I could enjoy things if I actually learned to try to appreciate them in relation to my main interests. So, …

Autopilot Off

“Now More Than Ever” Truong Tran On days when I am not working as a poet and teacher, I try to wake up early. I empty my oversize messenger bag of books and papers and the previous day’s half-eaten lunch. I place the strap over my left shoulder, with the bag firmly secured to my back. I begin to walk. I walk for as long as it takes to fill the bag with stuff: branches, findings from the local thrift stores, choice items left in boxes on sidewalks, and—if I’m lucky—something I’ve never seen before. Once the bag is filled, I return home and empty the contents from the bag, creating mounds of what some might consider junk. I see them as source materials and the beginnings to my art-making process. I refer to what I do as art-making because I do not paint, draw, or sculpt with a traditional or learned consideration of artistic craft. I glue things together. I make things fit. I dip things in wax. I cut. I build. I weave. …